Between the Divine & Profane

 

 

 

Between the Divine & Profane

 

I propose using projection mapping throughout the Museum to highlight and revitalize different areas in the Museum. The Museum seems to have a few spaces with dark floors and others that are enclosed and vaulted. Thus, the Museum would be conducive to the medium of projection mapping for storytelling and education. Social Media initiatives like the Google Art and Culture Face-Match have been wildly popular in the US. Drawing inspiration from this, the Museum could use its account to make a mass request for people to caption sculptures in the Museum or to take pictures of themselves posing like sculptures in the Museum in their own daily settings. Because many of Marini’s sculptures were very posed and full of charged body language, it could be interesting to see the public’s interpretation of the sculptures’ tone. Marini himself was interested in iconic figures that could capture the cultural Zeitgeist, so it would be interesting to challenge those looking at his art to become their own icon or capture moments they think represent themselves. A collection of these moments could in turn produce an artistic message about our own cultural Zeitgeist. These captured moments would be projected near the statues to which they relate to give a fun and multilayered interpretation the art object. The posts could be sorted using Instagram’s API and screened for inappropriate content using Google’s Computer Vision API. Additionally, it would be interesting to project onto the Museum’s architectural elements both information and beautiful patterns to draw more attention to them. We could even project scenes of things that would have happened in the space when it was an active church, thereby bringing more narrative and storytelling into the Museum. The project would require MadMapper projection mapping software which rents for 35 Euros; at least two quality projectors that could be mounted from the ceiling for $2000-3000 if bought and $100-200 a day if rented for a period of time; and a subscription to Google’s Computer Vision API for between $10-50 a month depending on how popular the Instagram exercise became.

Nyantee Asherman